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Those of you who would have permission to plant tree's on the ground you hunt please consider a tree as part of your plan to hunt. Everyone has some kind of fruit tree or shrub that will grow on their land and in their climate. Now is the time to plant those tree's to get the highest rate of survival from them.[fall to early winter]
Those of you that are blessed enough to own your property or hunt on a place that would allow other long growth tree's can consider a wide choice of options to consider. There are such a wide selection of oaks that will provide food acorns, browse and cover that it certainly should be a heavy consideration for you.
What I really enjoy about the consideration of tree's in your wildlife programs is that many times planting is not the 1st step, it's helping the tree's you already have. Help them to receive better soil by fertilizing, less sunlight battle with other tree's and or simply give the tree better air to it's own root system.
I'm telling the truth when I tell you that you can add life and better fruitful results with just a rake and some liquid fertilizer to your oaks and other nut tree's. Of course land managers will prod you for a controlled burn, but like me, most of you will not have permission for that or even the resources to do it or pay for it to be done.
Listen I know countless number of hunters who enjoy hunting oak flats or other oak groves of some kind every year. Test me on this and watch the results. This year before spring, late winter is best [I think].
1] carry a bottle of water for yourself and a rock rake along with a leaf rake and go to your favorite oak tree or trees and pick the exact ones you set up next to. Take your time and start with the rock rake and get the heaviest part of the leaf litter removed about the same size area as the canopy of that tree.
Now take your time again and fine tune the same area with the leaf rake and expose the ground [soil].
You could stop right there and would have helped that tree just by giving it's roots air. But don't stop there.
2] Do some research about the type of tree your giving this special treatment to. Every area and tree type will thrive on certain minerals in the soil and that is what will lead you the type fertilizer your going to buy and mix.
Now I like a liquid fertilizer when working for these tree's but lots of folks certainly use the bagged type.
Really give the ground a good soaking with the fertilizer, gather your tools and get the heck out of there.

Your next hunting season around this tree is going to be exciting because this tree or these tree's you paid special attention to is going to enjoying your soft pats on the head and the fruit produced will show you it's appreciation.
I know hunters who have never planted food plots and think them to be cheating or baiting[I don't] but they give great care to special tree's and are greatly successful at harvesting good deer and they seem to do it on every place they lease.


I dont even claim to be some wise land and wildlife manager but I do know you can bump up the results in your favorite little spot with just a little extra time and care from you to help the tree's you hunt around.. if you hunt in and around tree's that is.


I have a white oak grove that produces a great amount of acorns each year and the deer are quick to snatch them up. This year, in late winter, I'm going to do this very act and document the whole process. I'm doing it as a project to show that even in a area of several acres of producing oaks that I can increase the activity at my stand above the activity on the other tree's of the same type and in the very same direct area. I've been doing doing quite a bit of reading on the subject and have some previous experience doing it but I'd like to challenge myself this time to a select few trees that are surrounded by the same species of tree's in order to prove that a little bit of "tree love" can increase or greatly increase[remains to be seen] your ability to harvest a deer at your favorite stand or blind.

I would so love it if some of you have any experience in this area that I could add to my efforts.
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Patience and Perseverance are qualities that are best practiced rather than preached
I have never really thought about the trees much. Trees are definitely a great perennial food source that produce year after year with very little ongoing work required. I was told when I bought my place it had 700 mature pecan trees but I have never counted them. The tree rats and the hogs love pecans and I am sure the deer do too. I often load my pockets on the way to the stand and pecans while setting in the tree.
"If I am not hunting or fishing I am probably somewhere talking about hunting or fishing"
Ya know,I'm actually going to try this with the rack. But as far as the fertilizing the trees thing,I've been doing that for years. It does help. I just wish i could find out the name of the fertilizer that i was given by my ex's father a few years ago. Or if he homemade brewed it with something. That stuff seemed to have Energized the living daylights out of one particular white oak tree i sprayed it around. Acorns the size of Golfballs and the Deer STAYED under that tree seemed like for years.
"Backwoods is the Right place too be"
Nastytater said...

Ya know,I'm actually going to try this with the rack. But as far as the fertilizing the trees thing,I've been doing that for years. It does help. I just wish i could find out the name of the fertilizer that i was given by my ex's father a few years ago. Or if he homemade brewed it with something. That stuff seemed to have Energized the living daylights out of one particular white oak tree i sprayed it around. Acorns the size of Golfballs and the Deer STAYED under that tree seemed like for years.


I'll get you the name of mine I'm using . one is a liquid pot ash and the other a liquid fert.
Patience and Perseverance are qualities that are best practiced rather than preached
Bill Costin said...

I have never really thought about the trees much. Trees are definitely a great perennial food source that produce year after year with very little ongoing work required. I was told when I bought my place it had 700 mature pecan trees but I have never counted them. The tree rats and the hogs love pecans and I am sure the deer do too. I often load my pockets on the way to the stand and pecans while setting in the tree.



man I don't know what I would or could do if I had hogs like you boys west and south of me.. it's hard for a guy like me w/no experience around them to grasp how bad they are and how tough it is to protect your deer grounds from their damage
Patience and Perseverance are qualities that are best practiced rather than preached
I've still been studying about the tree's and I have a great wild life nursery just south of me too that I can ask and get straight answers from. Given what I've learned from them [also all hunters], they recommend not using the liquid but a general triple 13 granular fert.
They also brought something to my attention that should have been obvious to me and I simply over looked it.
They advise anyone doing this to pick several spots [he had 6] to put your extra effort into. Just because the tree's themselves will have different times to drop their acorns and even different years to produce, especially the younger one's.
He also gave me a great back breaker saving tip. *He uses a gas powered leaf blower to help clear the canopy area when exposing the soil for the fertilizer.
Some time all we need to do is ask and other hunters are glad to share their experiences with you.
ps.. of course he kept hammering to do soil test and I know he's right but seldom do it. a habit I need to break
Patience and Perseverance are qualities that are best practiced rather than preached
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